Deutsches Zentrum für Zelltherapie

Cell Therapy

The cell extracts used in the past contained many different peptides in minimal amounts from animal source material. Through state-of-the-art manufacturing processes, it is now possible to produce the essence of cell extracts synthetically, without having resort to animal material and to adjust the dose used precisely to the patient.

For example, peptides can be used to stimulate the pituitary gland to secrete human growth hormone (HGH). This hormone is responsible for the breakdown of fat cells and the formation of muscle cells and at the same time inhibits inflammatory processes in the body. This peptide is strongly released in the body at a young age. However, with advancing age, this level decreases constantly.

Peptides can be used, for example, to stimulate the pituitary gland to release human growth hormone (HGH). This hormone is responsible for the breakdown of fat cells and the formation of muscle cells and at the same time inhibits inflammatory processes in the body. At a yonger age this peptide is strongly released in the body. With advancing age, this level constantly decreases (1).

​ A comparable example is found in a peptide called thymosin beta-4, which is responsible for the formation of lymphocytes, a subgroup of white blood cells. Until about the age of 40 the course of high peptide titres can be detected. After that, only low levels are found (2).


 
If physical complaints occur the course of life, this may be due to a deficiency of the body‘s own signal substances.

Peptides can be used to address very specific ailments leading  to a wide range of possibilities. They can be used for the general health, well-being and anti-aging applications.

Do you like to have more details about the possibiltities of peptides?
Would you like to know if a treatment with synthetic peptides is suitable for you?

Do not hesitate to contact us.

 

1) Garcia, J.M., Merriam, G.R., Kargi, A. Y. Growth Hormone in aging [Updated 2019 Oct 7]. In: Feingold KR, Anawalt B, Boyce A, et al., editors. Endotext [Internet]. South Dartmouth (MA): MDText.com, Inc.; 2000. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK279163/


​2) Consolini, R., Legitimo, A., Calleri, A., Milani, M. (2000). Distribution of age-related thymulin titres in normal subjects through the course of life. Clinical & Experimental Immunology, 121(3), 444-447. doi: 10.1046/j.1365-2249.2000.01315.x.